17 Most Lavish Royal Honeymoons Over The Years

  
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The Royals are used to being in the spotlight with every move they make and every public outing they attend being heavily publicized and, while Royal weddings are turned into the most extravagant events, like all couples they aim for privacy as they retreat to their honeymoons. Over the many years of Royal weddings across Europe, things have changed when it comes to weddings, royal traditions, and honeymoons, but there is never any doubt that they are always luxurious and lavish. Check out what couples went all out for the most lavish of getaways and how Royal honeymoons have changed over the years:

17. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

Queen Victoria was never one to do what is expected and resisted being forced into marriage by her mother before she fell for Prince Albert. It was Queen Victoria who proposed marriage to him in October 1839 and then, on February 10, 1840, the two were married in the Chapel Royal of St James’s Palace. Following their wedding day, Victoria gushed about her new husband in her diary, and they didn’t need an exotic getaway to celebrate their union. Due to Victoria’s demanding duties, she had to stay at Windsor Castle, but they spent three days celebrating their honeymoon even though they didn’t travel anywhere and, during those three days, Queen Victoria threw many impromptu balls which were considered inappropriate by the aristocracy. Despite only getting three days to enjoy her new marriage, she later described the small “break” as “most gratifying.”

Telegraph

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16. King George VI and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon

Although the monarchy may seem more progressive now than ever with Prince Harry marrying American actress Meghan Markle, back in 1923, King George VI raised eyebrows when he married Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon who was not of royal birth, and he was not deterred when he proposed not once but three times before she finally accepted. The pair were married on April 26, 1923, at Westminster Abbey where Elizabeth began the tradition of royal brides placing their bouquet on the tomb of the Unknown Warrior. For their honeymoon, the newlyweds spent a few weeks at Polesden Lacey in Surrey, a country manor house where they spent time playing golf and tennis and taking long walks. They then spent a couple more weeks at Elizabeth’s family home, Glamis Castle in Scotland, to complete their five-week honeymoon. Unfortunately, the poor weather caused Elizabeth to become sick with whooping cough, which did little for their honeymoon as she described it as “not a very romantic disease.”

Royal Central

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