5 Most Underrated Movies Of 2015

  
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For every film that is released in any given calendar year, there are some that slip through the red carpet cracks and the masses fail to notice. In fairness to these films, the vast majority are lower budget, independently produced films that made their way to the public eye through film festivals or small distribution deals. While others are bigger budget, studio funded features that simply don’t get the attention they deserve–think Edge of Tomorrow in 2014. These five should go on your list of “should see” for 2015.

5. Kumiko The Treasure Hunter

The name of the film is a trip in and of itself. Kumiko The Treasure Hunter debuted at several premier world film festivals, and scored a solid distribution deal for the indie film. The movie starred a Japanese woman who is fed up with life in Tokyo, the film was written and directed by the Zellner brothers–David and Nathan–and it features such a wonderful twist as to what one does when they (she) are (is) is done with the daily grind. A perfect homage to the Coen brothers, and their cinematic masterclass, Fargo, Kumiko The Treasure Hunter features Kumiko, leaving her Tokyo life to pursue an obsession: the money hidden in the snowy, North Dakota field by Steve Buscemi in the film Fargo. After all, according to the film, nobody ever found the money after his character was shot in the face. If you love indie weird, this film is for you.

©Amplify/courtesy Everett Collection

©Amplify/courtesy Everett Collection

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4. Legend

We made mention of Legend when recently fawning over Tom Hardy, but it seems the film is somehow slipping through the cracks in the United States because people don’t know who the Kray twins are. For lack of better comparison, they are similar to the America’s Menendez brothers, but ten times more violent in crimes and reputation. Tom Hardy plays both men, and it is one of the finest performance(s) of the year, and of the 21st century. For those with a love of darkly comedic violence, the film surely delivers. Legend was written and directed by the supremely underrated Brian Helgeland, who wrote L.A. Confidential back in the day. How this guy isn’t a household name is beyond us! The creative team captured the mid-century modern era of Britain to near perfection, and inserted American muscle via automotive engineering. A most excellent mix.

©Universal Pictures/courtesy Everett Collection

©Universal Pictures/courtesy Everett Collection

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