14 Shocking Revelations From The Little Couple’s “Life Is Short (No Pun Intended)”

  
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Since 2009, Bill Klein and Dr. Jennifer Arnold have been sharing their lives with the world as the stars of TLC’s The Little Couple. For over eight seasons, the pair has become two of the most popular reality stars out there, because their show isn’t about unnecessary drama or exaggerated fights, it is about their real, honest life. The couple have shared a lot with fans who have welcomed them with open arms but in 2015 they decided to share more than ever before with their first ever book Life Is Short (No Pun Intended) which focused on their childhoods and their life before TV stardom. In case you haven’t had the chance to check it out, here are 14 of the most shocking revelations from the book:

14. Jen’s Arrival!

In an effort to give fans the full story of both of their lives, Jen and Bill started right from the beginning. The first chapter is all about Jen’s arrival and childhood and gave shocking insights on how difficult it was for her family to get the proper diagnosis and what that meant for Jen growing up. Jen’s parents had no idea that they were going to have a baby with health issues, and when she was born it took quite some time before doctors were able to correctly diagnose her with her specific type of dwarfism – spondyloepophyseal dysplasia (SED), type Strudwick. As a result of her SED, Jen had an incredibly difficult childhood and had her first surgery at two years old and revealed by the time she was 18 she had undergone more than 22 surgical procedures.

Source: TLC

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13. It’s A Boy!

Bill’s arrival story was just as intense as Jen’s and he shared a theory as to why he was born with SED. Bill explained that his father served in the war in Vietnam, and wrote, “It has been speculated that my father’s exposure to Agent Orange while serving in Vietnam was a contributing factor to my short stature. The exposure, which can result in flu-like symptoms among other things, is now known to denature the sperm’s DNA, causing random mutations,” Bill wrote but added there is no way of knowing for sure his father’s exposure had anything to do with Bill being born with SED. Unfortunately for Bill, his unexpected stature caused many problems at the hospital with his delivering doctor leaving the room, never to return, and the medical team deciding to keep him from his mother for days before bringing him to her. As with Jen, it took some time before Bill’s family became connected to the right doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and at 14 months he was finally diagnosed with SED. Bill’s parents welcomed two more sons after him, Tom and Joe, but even though he was shorter, he was always the big brother. “I was built like a Mack truck, and I always fought my battles aggressively […] That was kind of the way it went. My brothers were younger than me, and even though they were taller as well, they were not stronger.”

Source: TLC

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