12 Hidden Details On Kate Middleton’s Wedding Dress You Didn’t Know About

  
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Kate Middleton’s highly polished sense of style has inspired and guided aspiring fashionistas ever since she was first spotted on the arm of Prince William! On the day of her wedding back on April 29, 2011, the soon-to-be Duchess of Cambridge stepped out wearing one of the most iconic and highly anticipated wedding dresses known to date. The dress and its designer Sarah Burton were kept top secret for months leading up to the event and were not officially announced until just prior to the service when Kate stepped out of her car to enter Westminster Abbey. The dress took months to make under highly confidential conditions, which means there are quite a few hidden details about the intricate design you probably didn’t know. Follow along for 12 hidden details you likely didn’t know about Kate Middleton’s iconic wedding dress:

12. The lace was highly intricate and strategic in its creation

The lace appliques on her McQueen design were handmade by the Royal School of Needlework and they used a design called Carrickmacross that began in Ireland in the 1920s. The employees who worked on the lace were mandated to wash their hands every 30 minutes to ensure the lace was pure white when Kate walked down the aisle. The flowers of the lace were also specifically chosen and were actual flowers including roses, thistle, daffodils, and shamrocks.

Photo by Ray Tang / Rex Features

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11. Designer Sarah Burton was sworn to secrecy under a confidentiality agreement

Sarah Burton, the creative director who took over Alexander McQueen, was the leading force behind the Kate Middleton dress design and was required to sign a confidentiality agreement from Buckingham Palace. She was sworn to secrecy and denied any allegations that she was the designer right up until the moment Kate stepped out of her hotel on the way to Westminster Abbey. The secret project was so closely guarded that even Burton’s parents were unaware of her involvement in the creation. “Because my core team knew, it was okay for me to disappear and come back, then disappear again,” she explained in an interview with Vogue. “But I remember other people asking me, ‘Are you coming in on Friday?’ and I’d say, ‘Oh, yeah, see you in the morning.’ I’d be scheduling meetings knowing full well I wasn’t going to be there for them.”

Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

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