‘Trading Spaces’: 8 Behind The Scenes Secrets

  
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The home renovation show on TLC known as Trading Spaces was a huge hit during the early 2000s. The reality program ran for eight season from 2000 to 20008 and was based directly off the BBC series Changing Rooms. This show laid the groundwork for many other reality home improvement shows and reality television in general. The success of Trading Spaces allowed for many spin-off series like Trading Spaces: Family, Trading Spaces: Boys vs. Girls, Trading Spaces: Home Free, and many more. The premise of the show was around two neighbors who swapped homes for 48 hours, each worked with a designer to redesign a room in each others home on a budget of only $1,000! One of the most intriguing parts of the show was that nothing was off limits — so there was a huge element of shock and surprise. It’s now been eight years since the show was on the air and although we miss it dearly. There’s are many more HGTV and home improvement shows that have stepped in to take it’s place, but Trading Spaces will always be the first of its kind! Here’s a look at 8 behind the scenes secrets from Trading Spaces!

8. Plans are Kept Top Secret

Susan Leaderman, a former contestant on Trading Spaces, said everything about what is happening in their home is kept top secret and the individuals are almost on house arrest to keep them from seeing what’s going on at their house. “I didn’t even know who my designer would be until the morning of filming. During the two-day makeover, I had to live at my neighbor’s house — and felt like I was under house arrest! I was completely banished from my home, and the show’s producers went to great lengths to make sure I didn’t see any projects being done. They hung sheets on the windows and other shielding mechanisms around our homes. In fact, when the producer from my home makeover went to my neighbors’, even the paint splotches on her clothing were covered with duct tape so I couldn’t see the colors being used.” All of this ensures that the reveal at the end of the show is genuine and not at all staged.

© TLC / Courtesy: Everett Collection

© TLC / Courtesy: Everett Collection

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7. Qualifications to be on the Show

An article in Good Housekeeping outlines what would cause an individual to be automatically disqualified from participating in the show and a lot of them have to do with accessible location. The first listed qualification is that their must be room on the property for a tractor trailer to park out front and there must also be space to set up “carpentry world” which requires room for construction and heavy-duty tools. Also, the two houses cannot be more than a two-minute walk from each other because the designers and film crew need to constantly shuttle back and forth. Lastly, one of the most important qualifications for being on the show is that a homeowner has to give up control of their home. They must allow designers to alter any household items like curtains, cabinets, flooring and furniture.

warrenproductions.com

warrenproductions.com

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