8 Differences Between The ‘Wayward Pines’ Book And TV Series

  
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Adapting a TV series from a book can be tricky…to be honest adapting anything from a book can be tricky, but Wayward Pines took great measures to ensure the jump from page to screen would be successful. Of course the transition can’t be entirely seamless as many changes have to be made to ensure a full run can be plotted out and the pacing is just right. As the Fox series gets ready to end this week, we thought it would be fun to take a look at some of those differences and see how producers changed the book to fit the medium. Here are 8 differences between the Wayward Pines book and series.

Disclaimer: Just a reminder, spoilers ahead.

8. The Year

Okay…if you are reading this, you either know the story’s big twist or want to learn about it before watching/reading, so let’s jump right in and talk about that time jump.

Just like in the book, the series takes places decades upon decades upon decades later in time after Earth’s inhabitants have pretty much killed themselves off. Yet the series sends us way way way further in time. In the series, Ethan (Matt Dillon) ends up “awakening” in 4028, but in the books it is somewhere around the year 3800.

So where did producers pick 4028 from? Simple… 2014 + 2014 = 4028. Kind of fun right? In addition, the date of “awakenings” changes for select characters…most specifically for Ethan’s family who are brought out of sleep-mode many years earlier than Ethan.

Source: Fox

Source: Fox

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7. The Betrayal

“Do not discuss your life before Wayward Pines.”

That is one of the rules that people of Wayward Pines live by and what ultimately leads to Beverly’s (Juliette Lewis) death. In the series, Ethan and Beverly have dinner with Kate (Carla Gugino) and Harold (Reed Diamond) the night of their planned escape. After Beverly freaks out and goes into her past, Kate and Harold realize she’s a loose cannon and probably planning a escape, so they do the neighborly thing in Wayward Pines and turn her into the authorities (yep, nice bunch).

Yet in the books the dinner party from hell never actually happens, though the same endgame plays out when Beverly and Ethan’s escape plan is thwarted and readers get their first taste of what happens when someone breaks the rules. And the “reckonings” are just as brutal, but they are called “fetes” in the book. Seriously if you want a laugh look up what a “fete” actually is…talk about dark humor.

Liane Hentscher/©Fox/courtesy Everett Collection

Liane Hentscher/©Fox/courtesy Everett Collection

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