10 Things You Didn’t Know About ER

  
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Grey’s Anatomy wasn’t the first medical drama to steal our hearts. Before we were introduced to the surgical interns of Seattle, viewers were captivated with the thrilling and suspenseful inner world of ER. The NBC series premiered back in 1994 and quickly became the longest-running primetime medical drama with a whopping 15 seasons under its belt. The show was a big success both critically as the most nominated drama program in history and with fans who loyally followed the show from beginning to end. ER has been over for quite some time now, but it’s still well loved by fans. Here’s a look back at 10 things you might not have known about the medical drama ER!

10. It Began as a Movie Script

The original idea of “ER” came from best selling novelist, Michael Crichton, who had written a 180 page long movie script that featured more than 100 characters. Crichton wrote the script based on his time at Harvard Medical School in the 1960s, but didn’t get around to pitching the idea until 20 years later. The character of John Carter, who couldn’t start an IV, was based off Crichton himself. When the feature was pitched to NBC as a medical drama, Crichton was at the peak of his career with the success of Jurassic Park and had Steven Spielberg on board as a producer. A little wary about the whole thing, NBC greenlit the project to be featured as a two-hour movie, but after a lot of twists and turns it was renegotiated into a six-episode order.

Courtesy Everett Collection

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9. George Clooney Audition

George Clooney could probably land any film or television role he wanted today, but back when the casting began for ER, he definitely didn’t have the same pull in Hollywood as he does now. According to producer John Wells, Clooney, who was 33 at the time, begged him for the part! At that time he knew the ins and outs of television cause he’d bounced around between about 20 failed pilots. He was desperate to land a stable gig. “George was the first person to audition. He came after me for it. Our second day in the office, George showed up and wouldn’t leave until I’d let him audition…George got his hands on the material and was like a dog with a bone,” said Wells.

Source: Sven Arnstein / Gallery

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