10 Things You Didn’t Know About ‘Bring It On’

  
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Bring It On was a shocking success at the box office. This teen comedy drama was a sleeper hit that has become a timeless cult classic. It perfectly depicts the high school life of teenagers and is a funny take on the competitive world of cheerleading. The movie was led by a then 16-year-old Kirsten Dunst, along with Buffy the Vampire star Eliza Dushku, as well as Gabrielle Union and Jesse Bradford. The success of Bring It On has spawned an entire spin-off series with direct-to-video sequels like Bring It On Again, Bring It On: All or Nothing, Bring It On: In It to Win It and Bring It On: Fight to the Finish. It’s one of the most referenced and quoted films from the early 2000s and remains as popular today as it was 16 years ago! We’re super nostalgic about this film here at Fame10, so here’s a look back at 10 things you didn’t know about the movie Bring It On!

10. A Documentary

Many fans would be surprised to learn that Bring It On was originally supposed to be a documentary! Jessica Bendinger, the screenwriter for the movie first pitched the movie as a documentary for MTV called Cheer Fever. She was already experiencing success as a writer for the popular HBO series Sex and the City and had this great idea to tackle the competitive world of cheerleading. “It was about this very specific subculture of competitive cheerleading and her original draft would have been a three-hour cheerleading epic. It was dense,” said director Peyton Reed in an interview with Buzzfeed News. Reed was instantly hooked and intrigued by this intensely competitive world. “I had no idea I would find interest in competitive cheerleading, but I did in a big way. Jessica’s writing has such attitude. I liked what it had to say about the dynamics of high school. It turned cheerleading on its ear and made them the underdogs; traditionally cheerleaders are the untouchables in the caste system of high school and this script made you really root for them. I like what it had to say about entitlement.”

Universal

Universal

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9. Casting Decisions

It took a long time to find people to fill all of the supporting roles, but there were a few no-brainers like Eliza Duskhu who had already won hearts over with her role as Faith on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. One role that director Reed remembers well is casting Torrence Shipman. They first considered Marley Shelton for the lead. Reed said he fell in love with Shelton and thought she was perfect for the part, but there was one hitch — she was deciding between two films, Bring it On and Sugar and Spice. She ended up choosing Sugar and Spice and was soon replaced with Kirsten Dunst. “We started talking about who we could get to play Torrance and I immediately said Kirsten Dunst. I loved Kirsten Dunst and she looked the part and is such a tremendous actor.” But when she was offered the part, she declined! According to Reed, she didn’t like the script and was working on another movie in the Czech Republic. Reed was persistent with her and sent her another copy of the script after some rewrites. “I got on the phone with her and she liked the changes — I talked more about what we were going to change and she agreed to do the movie. Once we got her, everything else really fell into place,” he said.

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