10 Things You Didn’t Know About “10 Things I Hate About You”

  
Slide 1 of 5 | View On One Page

Some films stay with fans forever, and it is safe to say that 1999’s 10 Things I Hate About You is one of them. Despite being a teen film, it was so much more than that, with a witty, intelligent script and a perfect cast to pull it off, making it one of those movies that fans turn back to even 17 years later. As the years have gone on, the director, screenwriters and the cast have spilled secrets here and there about filming and working together, leaving us with these 10 things we never knew about 10 Things I Hate About You.

10. The Rooftop Song

The music is one of the best parts of 10 Things I Hate About You, and the band, Letters to Cleo, makes a couple of appearances. Aside from the prom scene, their most notable performance is at the end credits where they are performing precariously on the roof of the school, and according to lead singer Kay Hanley, it was really terrifying. “So they told us, ‘This is a helicopter shot, and it costs $500,000 every time the helicopter has to take off, so don’t f–k this up!’ As we started playing we saw the helicopter appear off in the distance. It’s hard to say how far away it was at first, because we were so high up in the air. But then all of a sudden the helicopter does this dive bomb directly toward us! Is the helicopter out of control? Is it supposed to be coming at us like this? And I’m thinking, ‘Don’t f–k up. keep singing the song, don’t f–k up, it costs 500 grand every time the copter takes off.’ It was unbelievably scary-but it turned out to be such an amazing shot.”


ADVERTISEMENT

9. The Tagline

Despite the fact that the film is based off of the famed William Shakespeare play “The Taming of the Shrew,” one of the film’s most used taglines had nothing to do with Shakespeare. The tagline used was, “How do I loathe thee? Let me count the ways,” which is a play on the famous line, “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” That line is actually the first line of Sonnet 43 from Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “Sonnets from the Portuguese.”

Mary Evans Picture Library

Mary Evans Picture Library

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT