10 Films That Should Have Won Best Picture

  
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Despite an ever-growing community of film lovers who question the relevancy of the Academy Awards, the Oscar for Best Picture is still widely regarded as the highest honor a film can receive. With any award there will be contention over the winner, and the Best Picture category is perhaps one of the most consistently debated awards around. Sometimes, the academy gets it right, such as in 2003 when they gave the award to Peter Jackson’s masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King; other times, they get it totally wrong. While there are many complicated factors that go into the decision-making process for choosing a winner, many film fans can agree that the Academy has made some questionable decisions over the years and given the wrong film the award on a number of occasions. Here is a list of the 10 Films that should have won Best Picture.

10. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

It’s difficult to appreciate now given how ingrained these films have become in our culture, but Peter Jackson’s first Lord of the Rings film was massively important. Jackson did what many thought was impossible by successfully converting J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic fantasy series to film, and he went one step further by making a film that was better than it had any right to be. The Fellowship of the Ring is equal parts action epic and emotional character drama and is a much better film than Ron Howard’s A Beautiful Mind, which took home the top prize that year. Thankfully, Jackson got the Best Picture win on his third try with 2003’s Return of the King, but Fellowship is, in its own way, just as good as that film and should have won in 2002.

Lord of the Rings Fellowship of the Ring

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9. Munich (2005)

The first of 3 Spielberg films to appear on this list, 2005’s Munich is one of his more underrated, despite receiving a Best Picture nomination. Both Munich and Crash, the film that beat it, cover bold and controversial subject matter; the difference is that Munich actually has something to say, while Crash is simply shocking for shocking’s sake, and considered racist by some critics. Munich did a much better job of tackling emotionally-charged racial issues, as it depicts a group of Jewish agents who retaliate against terrorists who committed the infamous 1972 Munich Massacres and come to question whether their violent retaliation is justified. A case could also be made for Brokeback Mountain, another nominee, being the film that should have won; regardless, Crash is not as good as either film, and did not deserve the win that year.

Munich

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