10 Directors Who Hated Their Own Movies

  
Slide 1 of 5 | View On One Page

There are many directors, including famous, master filmmakers, who hate their films. Some consider certain films mistakes, some cringe at the thought of the final product and others hated the experience and the delivered film so much, they pulled their name from the production. Does that mean these films are all bad? Hardly. Some were incredible box office successes, garnering impressive praise from the harshest of critics. There are even a few classics. Nonetheless, the directors were left with very sour tastes in their mouth. Here are 10 prime examples.

10. Michael Mann – HEAT

Considering the bigger picture, we’re throwing Michael Mann on here as an example of directors who hate their movies when they are re-cut for TV broadcast. Michael Mann was so vocal about his disdain for the “edited for television” Heat — a great film, which he loves and loved making — he took it to the mattresses. There are many directors who fit into this category, but none who continuously banged the drum like Mann. And he was right. It helped to offer more power and protection to directors when original works are edited for time and content. No TV audience will likely see old cuts of great films (e.g. Heat, Die Hard, Back to the Future) that have been “re-cut” as to not offend people’s eyes, ears or various schedules. It goes to show that complaining can be a good thing, when complaints are taken to the appropriate parties.

Source: Warner Bros.

Source: Warner Bros.

ADVERTISEMENT

9. Alfred Hitchcock – Rope

It is worth mentioning that a lot of the movies on this list are considered classics, regardless of directors disliking them, discounting them as failures or boldly proclaiming their hatred for a work. Such is the case for Alfred Hitchcock and Rope — an adaptation of a stage play that Hitchcock shot as if it were one continuous take. Audiences have to keep in mind the technology with which Hitchcock shot this film. The cameras were enormous, and ran 35mm film. The creative team maximized the length of the film rolls, then the camera creatively pushed, pulled and panned into objects — people — to create the cuts. At the time, Hitchcock disliked the film, calling it an experiment that failed. Little did he know the film would eventually score 8/10 on IMDb and 97 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, while visually inspiring Best Picture Award winners like Birdman.

Source: Warner Bros.

Source: Warner Bros.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT